Recipes

Georgia caviar recipe

If you thought black-eyed peas were only a Southern New Year’s staple, think again.

This humble legume, known to many as “poor people food,” is rich in nutritional value. It’s so rich, we have a black-eyed pea recipe in my family called “Georgia Caviar.”

The recipe is quick, tasty and packed with plant protein, dietary fiber, folate, potassium, iron and zinc. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, black-eyed peas are one of those rare foods that fall into both the protein and vegetable categories, so those of you keeping score can decide how to credit your diet plan.

Zesty Corn on the Cob

I had a flashback to corn on the cob as I watched workers set up the Chow Wagon at Waterfront Park for this year’s Kentucky Derby Festival. Grilled corn on the cob seems to be a mainstay at such events. Perhaps the draw is that it’s fresh and not deep-fried, like so much of the food available at festival events.

If you want an even healthier version of corn on the cob, here’s one that turns the typical buttered recipe on its ear. You may never slather on the butter again!

 

BLUEberry Salad

 

In honor of the UK Wildcats and the NCAA Final Four game tomorrow night, I’m sharing my favorite salad, which includes blueberries! The dressing is super light and delicious with an unexpected twist my husband, Paul, added. 

 

 

 

Salad recipe:

Box of fresh mixed greens (we like organic and they don’t cost much more than regular)

4-ounce package of fresh blueberries

4 ounces feta cheese crumbles

Almond slivers (or candied pecans, which I make ahead of time)

Small can of mandarin orange slices, drained

Groovy Smoothie

If you told my childhood self that one day I’d crave a spinach smoothie, the echo of my laughter probably still would be ringing today.

Oh, how my tune has changed! That Shrek-colored smoothie I’m slurping down is loaded with spinach. My kids will even drink one.

Back in the ‘60s and ‘70s, the spinach at my house came in a can, and it was slimy-seaweed slick. My mom liked to jazz it up with crumbled boiled eggs. It was the stuff of nightmares, complete with visions of the Grim Reaper coming to take me away, because I would rather die than eat it.

Orange Whip

The “Frosted Orange” from Atlanta’s Varsity drive-in is worth stopping for, if your Spring Break road trip takes you through that neck of the woods.

It’s a dreamy vanilla and orange-juice based shake-smoothie-slushie drink, often imitated. (Think Orange Julius.) My friend Melynda makes a version using Fanta orange, vanilla ice cream and shaved ice.

Black beans and rice

The cold weather will make a brief return this weekend - we hope. Here is a favorite around my house to quickly warm on the stove after outside play. The black beans provide a lot of solid protein while the rice gives you some carbohydrates to revitalize those tired bodies. A serving is only 128 calories, but it does have a bit of a sodium kick so beware for those with high blood pressure.

Peanut Butter Balls

There’s a subject that keeps popping up on the Facebook page for the elementary school I attended in Georgia.

In between memories of pony rides at the Halloween carnival and debates over who held the Field Day record for fastest 50-yard dash, there are lots of entries about the Cafetorium.

We all remember that the Cafetorium was the combo cafeteria and auditorium (clever, eh?). But what everyone wants to know is this: Who has the recipe for the Cafetorium’s peanut butter bars?

Healthy Cooking on a Budget

It’s a new year and a new you, right? You’re working out seven times a week and eating 1,200 calories a day, drinking lots of water and kicking stress in the butt left and right! OK, maybe not. In reality, you might be seeing your grocery bill climbing as you cook healthier meals for your family. Maybe you’re struggling to find the time to cook all the fresh produce you’re buying lately.

Valentine's Day Dinner - Steak and Asparagus

I believe the year, was 1998 B.C. (Before Children)

We had learned our lesson on previous Valentine’s Days. Dinner out on Valentine’s Day is best left for those too young or too love-struck to care about the crowds. (That’s what we told ourselves. Also, we had no reservations.)

Thus began our tradition: A romantic dinner at home and then a special date night later, when restaurants aren’t so overwhelmed. (Kind of a Valentine’s BOGO bonus!) And what better way to celebrate all-things Valentine than with a menu like this:

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