Women’s Health

Oncofertility specialist builds hope and families

It’s hard to imagine the difficulty of dealing with a cancer diagnosis. Add to that the worry that the cancer treatment you must receive to save your life may also take away your ability to have children.

A new physician with Norton Cancer Institute works to address this concern from cancer patients by preserving their fertility. Leslie Appiah, M.D., is an oncofertility specialist. She works with children and adults with cancer before they begin receiving chemotherapy or radiation to counsel them on options and steps that may be taken to improve their ability to have children later. She also works with patients trying to conceive after cancer treatment. 

What it means to have dense breasts

When you stop and think about them, breasts are pretty complicated. Large or small, they all are made up of lobules, ducts, fatty tissue and fibrous connective tissue. And some are more dense than others, meaning they have more fibrous tissue and less fatty tissue.

“Breast density is very common and not abnormal,” said Michele Myers, diagnostic imaging manager at Norton Women’s and Kosair Children’s Hospital). “As many as 50 percent of women have a moderate to high level of dense breast tissue.”

My Journey through Pelvic Pain

My name is Krystal and I want to share my story in hopes it will help other women. I am a wife to a wonderful husband and mother of two beautiful children. My husband and I had been married for about a year and three months when I got pregnant with our first child. Our intimate life was great prior to this, but during my pregnancy I started experiencing pelvic pain, especially when my husband and I were together. At the time my obstetrician would tell me that it was more than likely a lubrication issue. She suggested several different lubricants, but it never seemed to take care of the problem. 

Making sense of the mammography maelstrom

Just when you think you’re thoroughly confused over the latest news report about getting annual mammograms, another report comes out and confuses you even more. Are mammograms beneficial in detecting cancer? Should you skip them? Should you do breast self exams? Should you just leave it all to chance? If you’re as perplexed as most over seemingly conflicting information about mammograms, read on.

Breastfeeding challenge: Going back to work

You’ve brought a beautiful new baby into the world. You’ve made the decision to breastfeed and have been breastfeeding exclusively for the first weeks of your child’s life. But you’ll be returning to work soon. Now what?

Many new moms face the challenge of going back to work while breastfeeding. Continuing to breastfeed while working presents barriers and brings up many questions: Can I pump milk at work? How will I pump? How often should I pump? Where can I store breast milk at work? What if I have to travel while I work?

Breastfeeding benefits for you and baby

There are a lot of questions, apprehensions and anxiety that comes with being a new parent. But within all the questions and the many answers and opinions you’ll likely receive from others, there is one question that should be easy for new moms to answer: Should I breastfeed? The simple answer is yes. While there may be complications or setbacks, and some moms just aren’t able to breastfeed, most moms should consider breastfeeding for at least the first six months of their baby’s life.

Gynecologic surgery options for women are better than ever

Maria Johnson was tired all the time. “I just didn’t have any energy,” said the 44-year-old insurance recovery specialist. “I discovered that I had uterine fibroids about 15 years ago. On the advice of my doctors we kept tabs on them through regular ultrasounds.” Over time those fibroids grew, some into the size of a cantaloupe. “I was experiencing heavy cramping and bleeding, plus I was just so tired,” Johnson said. “It was time to do something.”

Fibroids are benign (noncancerous) tumors of the uterus that usually do not cause symptoms. However, depending on the number, size and location, they can cause complications such as those experienced by Johnson.

Johnson’s primary care physician and her gynecologist suggested a hysterectomy as the best option to her uterine fibroid problem, but she was opposed. “I am a breast cancer survivor. I went through a radical mastectomy, and I just didn’t want to go through another major procedure,” she said. That is when a friend told her about uterine fibroid embolization (UFE).

Facts about Pelvic Health for women

We had a chance to speak with two Norton Healthcare providers to find out more about women’s pelvic health. Jonathan H. Reinstine, M.D., is an obstetrician/gynecologist with Associates in Obstetrics & Gynecology, a Part of Norton Women’s Care, and Melissa Ulfe, BSN, R.N., CBCN, is the women’s health nurse navigator at Norton Suburban Hospital, future home of Norton Women’s and Kosair Children’s Hospital. They shared with us their top videos for helping women better understand pelvic health and how women can become empowered to speak with their doctors about their “below the belt” health.

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